Konami Hops on Classic Console Nostalgia Bandwagon with the Turbografx-16 Mini

Konami is taking a break from managing pachinko parlors, health clubs, and shitting all over the Metal Gear franchise by launching the Turbo Grafx-16 Mini.

Full disclosure, the Turbo Grafx-16 holds a sentimental piece of my heart. First off, it was a decent console, going up against monsters like Sega and Nintendo. Secondly, a good childhood friend owned one and I have a lot of great memories playing the console together. Lastly, I was given a TurboExpress for Christmas ’90, and it was by far, one of the coolest gifts I have ever received. The fact that it was a portable that played the same games as the home console equivalent was mind boggling at the time, even though it sucked up AA batteries faster than Rick James sucked up coke.

If you’re astute, you may be thinking why Konami is launching this. Simply put, the TurboGrafx-16 was co-developed by Hudson and NEC. Konami fully absorbed Hudson Soft in 2012, so Konami now owns the brand.

So yes, Konami is cashing in on nostalgia and doing what they do best, which is milking the brands they own while putting in minimal effort, but at least the titles announced so far look good. Also, if the U.S. version doesn’t get Bonk’s Adventure, that’s bullshit.

Konami is also recognizing all the console variants and games for different regions, so depending where you live, you’ll get the mini specific to your region.

North America / Europe:

  • R-Type
  • Ys Book I & II
  • New Adventure Island
  • Ninja Spirit
  • Alien Crush
  • Dungeon Explorer

Japanese:

  • Bonk’s Adventure
  • Dracula X
  • The Kung Fu/China Warrior
  • Ys I & II
  • Super Star Soldier
  • Dungeon Explorer

Konami has not yet disclosed price and launch details.

Kojima’s Final Year at Konami Wasn’t Pleasant According to Keighley

We should thank our lucky stars that Hideo Kojima was able to make Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain the game that it is. Kojima apparently created this game under conditions that are even more adverse than the gaming community realized.

According to Geoff Keighley, who was interviewed by Glixel, the situation that Kojima found himself during his final six months was toxic.

“I haven’t talked much about that, but it was such a difficult time because he was going through a lot last year,” Keighley says. He was shocked when he found out – just days before the show – that Konami wasn’t going to allow Kojima to attend, and he felt he had to say something, despite the company being a sponsor. “The fact that he finished that game under those circumstances is just amazing. He was locked in a separate room on a different floor than his development team for the final six months of development. He couldn’t even talk to them – he had to talk through someone else. That’s how that game was finished.”

It truly is amazing that this game was as good as it, being that it was completed under such conditions. In the past, I thought that Hideo Kojima was overrated as a game maker. I don’t feel like that anymore.

Now, just imagine what he’s going to be able to accomplish with Death Stranding under optimum conditions.