There is One Console That’s Going to Miss Its Holiday 2020 Launch

There is one “high profile” console that has been in development for quite some time that will miss its 2020 Holiday launch. It’s not the Xbox Series X or the PlayStation 5 however, but rather the Intellivision Amico.

Okay, so maybe this is not an earth shattering delay for core gamers, but I’m sure there were folks who were pining for this thing.

Intellivision CEO, Tommy Tallarico (so that’s what Tommy’s been up to) has announced the delay during a livestream intended to show off the consoles initial library and gameplay.

The delay is due to challenges from the Covid-19 pandemic, which has impacted pretty much everything imaginable globally. This is a real shame actually, as this is a cool looking device with a library of “wholesome” games for the whole family. I think it’s safe say that Mortal Kombat 11 will not be ported to this thing.

The plan is to now release a Founder’s Edition to initial backers on April 3, 2021, followed by a full launch a little later on April 15, 2021.

[Source: Intellivision]

The NEOGEO Arcade Stick Pro is a Retro Fighter Lover’s Dream

There is officially a glut of mini retro consoles out there. There is the good, like the NES Classic and the Genesis mini, and the supremely shitty PlayStation Classic. Now we have the NEOGEO Arcade Stick Pro, which looks to be good, as long as you love retro fighters.

SNK revealed the NEOGEO Arcade Stick Pro earlier in the month, but they finally release details on the games today.

The NEOGEO Arcade Stick Pro,with 20 selected titles pre-installed, can be used as a controller for NEOGEO Mini. It is designed for all NEOGEO fans.Connecting the NEOGEO mini or NEOGEO mini PAD to the NEOGEO Arcade Stick Pro, you can enjoy a fierce gaming experience.The size is W430mm×D214mm, similar to other arcade sticks.It can be put and played even on your knees stably.

At the moment, we have plans for a world-wide release. (However, please understand that the specifics may change based on the country.) Please wait for more updates concerning launch date and price.

THE KING OF FIGHTERS ’95
THE KING OF FIGHTERS ’97
THE KING OF FIGHTERS ’98
THE KING OF FIGHTERS ’99
THE KING OF FIGHTERS 2000
THE KING OF FIGHTERS 2002
FATAL FURY SPECIAL
FATAL FURY 3
GAROU: MARK OF THE WOLVES
SAMURAI SHODOWN Ⅱ
SAMURAI SHODOWN Ⅲ
SAMURAI SHODOWN IV
SAMURAI SHODOWN Ⅴ SPECIAL
ART OF FIGHTING
WORLD HEROES 2
WORLD HEROES 2 JET
WORLD HEROES PERFECT
NINJA MASTER’S
THE LAST BLADE 2
KIZUNA ENCOUNTER

SNK

That is a literal shit ton of fighters, most of them high quality. If fighters are your thing then maybe the NEOGEO Arcade Stick Pro is your bag.

Old and Overrated NES Game Sells for $9000 at Auction

I dream of finding something rare and valuable at a garage sale. You hear about it all the time. Some jerk goes to a garage sale and unknowingly buys a fucking copy of the Magna Carta. Then its all champagne, caviar, and coke parties ever after.

Well, some lucky prick from Nevada is up $9,000 because he had some very forgetful parents. Scott Amos of Reno, NV was cleaning out his childhood home’s attic when he found a sealed copy of Kid Icarus for the NES along with an accompanying receipt from December 8, 1988.

How the game got there, no one knows for sure, but it’s possible that it was an forgotten Christmas gift.

Mr. Amos shared his find with Heritage Auctions who confirmed that he’s one lucky S.O.B.

“Kid Icarus is one of the hardest NES titles to find in sealed condition... To find a sealed copy ‘in the wild,’ so to speak, not to mention one in such a nice condition and one with such transparent provenance, is both an unusual and rather historic occurrence. We feel that the provenance will add a significant premium for serious collectors.”

Valarie McLeckie, Video Game Consignment Director at Heritage Auctions (Reno Gazette Journal)

That rarity, translated into $9,000 for Mr. Amos.

All joking aside, Scott Amos plans to share his windfall with family.

“I have an older sister, too. We’re splitting (the proceeds) 50-50. We’re going to do a Disney World vacation next month. Instead of doing something responsible, we’re going to have some fun with it.”

Reno Gazette Journal

Now I feel like the asshole, because he seems to be a nice guy.

[Source: Reno Gazzette Journal]

Konami Hops on Classic Console Nostalgia Bandwagon with the Turbografx-16 Mini

Konami is taking a break from managing pachinko parlors, health clubs, and shitting all over the Metal Gear franchise by launching the Turbo Grafx-16 Mini.

Full disclosure, the Turbo Grafx-16 holds a sentimental piece of my heart. First off, it was a decent console, going up against monsters like Sega and Nintendo. Secondly, a good childhood friend owned one and I have a lot of great memories playing the console together. Lastly, I was given a TurboExpress for Christmas ’90, and it was by far, one of the coolest gifts I have ever received. The fact that it was a portable that played the same games as the home console equivalent was mind boggling at the time, even though it sucked up AA batteries faster than Rick James sucked up coke.

If you’re astute, you may be thinking why Konami is launching this. Simply put, the TurboGrafx-16 was co-developed by Hudson and NEC. Konami fully absorbed Hudson Soft in 2012, so Konami now owns the brand.

So yes, Konami is cashing in on nostalgia and doing what they do best, which is milking the brands they own while putting in minimal effort, but at least the titles announced so far look good. Also, if the U.S. version doesn’t get Bonk’s Adventure, that’s bullshit.

Konami is also recognizing all the console variants and games for different regions, so depending where you live, you’ll get the mini specific to your region.

North America / Europe:

  • R-Type
  • Ys Book I & II
  • New Adventure Island
  • Ninja Spirit
  • Alien Crush
  • Dungeon Explorer

Japanese:

  • Bonk’s Adventure
  • Dracula X
  • The Kung Fu/China Warrior
  • Ys I & II
  • Super Star Soldier
  • Dungeon Explorer

Konami has not yet disclosed price and launch details.

Get Your Hands on the Sega Genesis / Mega Drive September 19

As young boy, I was a Sega fanboy. Things weren’t so great when I was the only kid in my grade with a Master System, but oh boy did I become an arrogant shit when the Sega Genesis came out, vindicating years of devotion to all things Sega.

Now, Sega fanboys the world over can relive the 16-Bit glory days on September 19, 2019, when Sega releases the Genesis Mini for approximately $80.

The playlist and hardware will vary by region, similarly to the NES and SNES Classics. This time around however, Sega is handling the hardware production and software emulation is being done by highly competent development studio M2, which handled the Sega Ages series. Good to hear that Sega is not contracting with shady Brazilian developer Tectoy for this run.

The Ataribox is Not Going to be Cheap

Information regarding the Ataribox has been relatively limited lately, but there are a few interesting nuggets to be found in a recent e-mail newsletter from the company.

For what its worth, the console  will ship with an AMD customized processor with Radeon graphics, according to a VetnureBeat interview with Ataribox creator and general manager Feargal Mac Conuladh. “The machine will run the kind of games that a mid-range PC can do today, but it won’t run Triple-A games that require high-end PC performance.”

The machine is also not going to be cheap, with a planned price tag $250-$300 (£185-£225). Fans who are involved in the Indiegogo campaign will also have access to special editions and exclusive pricing, however.

My take, the hardware itself looks beautiful, in all its retro wood goodness, but your $300 will be better spent on a PS4 or Xbox One.

[Source: VentureBeat]

Look What’s Just Laying Around Nintendo’s Storage Closets

00000419_01

I don’t speak or read Japanese, but a picture is worth a thousand words.

Nintendo of Japan has pulled back the curtain bit in a blog post showing off some storage closets containing their classic consoles and peripherals from the 1980’s. The kicker is that these devices are PRISTINE and still in original packaging.

I bet they still have that new console smell.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

Buying Games Used to be Convoluted, but Magical

Buying a game today is a non-event. You simply go to a store, pick up the game, walk to the checkout and pay for it. Some retailers, like Target or Walmart, keep them behind a display (CLASSY), which requires the extra step of asking a kind associate for assistance, that is if you can find one.

i_26546
GameStop keeps their games behind the checkout, so you need to ask for a copy, which in return they would ask if you pre-ordered it, which my response is was, NO I DIDN’T FUCKING PRE-ORDER IT, BUT YOU HAVE A STACK OF 100 OF THEM BACK THERE SO GIVE ME ONE GODDAMNIT! I have a love/hate relationship with GameStop. It’s one of the reasons why I don’t buy physical copies of games anymore and just download them, like a civilized person. I have also been told that I have a tendency of over reacting.

Back in the day however, there was a process that must be followed when purchasing a game. This was especially the case at Toys R Us, which was my retailer of choice to buy games when I was a kid.

bac5b5b977f74c2f0cfb3ef9673e0583
This unique process, employed by Toys R Us, has been embedded and buried into the depths of my mind. This memory was only uncovered recently after watching a documentary about Tony Robbins on Netflix late one evening.

During this documentary, Tony Robbins, motivational speaker, life coach, self-help guru, and cosmetic dentistry enthusiast, demonstrated an exercise that helps uncover long lost memories. These memories, often times deeply buried, are both positive and negative, but none-the-less, make you the person that you are today. These memories can be very powerful and one can harness them, helping to make you a stronger person.

tony-robbins
With that said, after trying this memory dredging exercise myself, I have no fucking idea why I remembered, and quite vividly I might add, the convoluted and confusing video game buying process employed by Toys R Us from when I was a child.  It’s apparent that my brain is broken. No memories of early vacations, or interactions with my grandparents, birthdays, holidays, or even traumatic events. Nope, I remembered how Toys R Us made the process of buying video games akin to a trip to the Department of Motor Vehicles.

For those of you who are too young to remember, or may have forgotten, back in the 80’s and the early to mid-90’s, Toys R Us used a ticketing system for the majority of their large and or expensive products. One would walk down the aisle, find a display of the product they wanted to purchase, select a ticket, take it to the register, pay, and then someone would get you the product you purchased.  If you bought a bicycle, someone would bring you a box of an unassembled bicycle. If you bought swing set, someone would bring you a swing set, et cetera.

Many Toys R Us stores still employ this method, as it does make sense, and it is efficient for large bulky items. Toys R Us used this method for pricier things as well years ago, such as electronics and especially video games.

toy-aisle-atari-1983
As a child, I remember going down the video game aisle and seeing rows and rows of plastic flip cards for games.  The front had the box art and the back had some screen shots and a description. Essentially, it was a representation of the box.  And just below each game, there was a pouch with the fabled Toys R Us item ticket.

tumblr_m1cwmolxye1r1x71p
I have vivid memories of going into Toys R Us with my mom or dad to pick up a particular game, only to encounter an empty ticket pouch stating that the game was out of stock and be an utterly devastated 8-year-old. Perhaps it was a mistake. Maybe some asshole took all the tickets and hid them somewhere in the store for some nefarious reason?  Maybe the store just got more in stock and didn’t replenish the tickets? A quick trip to customer service would always validate my fears. The game was indeed sold out.

hqdefault
More often than not, the game that I wanted was in stock, and I would select my ticket and excitedly go to the front cash registers, like a demented Charlie Bucket, but instead of a golden ticket to Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory, I was buying what was most likely a forgettable and utterly average NES side scroller.

charliebucketwinsgold

After paying for the game at one of the cash registers, the cashier would staple your receipt to the ticket and that is where the magic begins. You then head off to what appeared to be as an excitable child, a plexiglass monolith of electronic and video game goodness. Sadly, all images of this structure no longer exists.  All my image searches came up empty. The image below is the closest representation I could find.

08_monolith-2
Within the confines of this structure were stacks of every gaming console imaginable—NESs, Sega Master Systems, Gameboys, and random Atari garbage. Later on there would be the Genesis, SNES, TurboGrafx 16, and holy shit, was that a Neo Geo? Also housed in the clear monolith were games. Stacks upon stacks of games.

Eventually, a sales associate would be called down to get the game that you payed for. A lethargic and disinterested looking teenager would unlock the door, take your ticket, and then attempt to locate your purchased game among the stacks of other games. I say attempt, because they would inevitably pass over your game a half dozen times before zeroing in on it.

IT’S RIGHT OVER THERE MOTHERFUCKER!

…I totally would have said that—if my father wasn’t standing there and would have totally beaten the shit out of me, right there in the store. Remember, this was the 1980’s, parents got away with doing that, and if he got tired slapping me around in public, another parent would have come over and beat me while my father caught his breath.  It takes a village to raise children properly, you know.

abusive_father1_7631
Eventually, the teenager would locate your game and hand it over.  I would stare at the box the entire car ride home.  Sometimes, I could not help myself and I would open it up to flip through the instruction manual. Those were the good old days, when games had instruction manuals. The best games had meaty manuals, that contained some back story and a list of enemies.

On a slightly darker side, I also clearly remembered how my friends and I used to scheme during lunch on an Ocean’s 11 caliber plan to infiltrate that plexiglass fortress and make off with all the goodies inside. It was our casino bank vault, ripe for the picking, that is of course if you had a good plan, the right people, and the guts to pull it off such an amazing heist.

oceans11

I bet you thought the Clooney version, right? Nope, I’m talking about the infinitely cooler Rat Pack Ocean’s 11.

There were even legends of kids who had found a way in and made off with a handful of carts (or even consoles, depending on who you asked).  These kids then conveniently moved away to other towns, cities and even states, so it could never be confirmed or denied if the story was true or even learn how they pulled it off. Sometimes the tales were cautionary and the kid got caught, sent to juvey and became a hardened criminal. These stories were all legends, who knew if there was any shred of truth to them. (DEFINITELY NOT)

juvenile_delinquent
Risks of juvenile detention aside, my friends and I would speak in hushed tones and plan our caper. Danny would buy a cheap game so that someone would need to unlock the booth. Brucie would wait by the booth and fake a heart attack when the sales associate unlocks the door, causing a commotion and a distraction. Johnny would then go into the booth with a garbage bag and take as much as he can. He’ll then hand the haul off to Jimmy, who’s waiting outside on his bike. It was so crazy; it just might work!  SHHHHHHHH. A teacher’s aid was walking by, she’s onto us. CHANGE THE SUBJECT!

escape_alcatraz-lunch
Also, in the 80’s all of my friend’s names had to end in “-y” or ”-ie” for some reason.

We never did follow through with our plan. It was too risky, and too stupid. Deep down inside, we knew it would never work. We would have been caught in an instant, and our parents would have been called. They would then take turns beating the shit out of us in public.

It was the 80’s, after all. That’s how things were. It takes a village to raise children properly, you know.

5 Things To Do in Amsterdam Other than Playing Games at Your Hotel

In full disclosure, I have never visited Amsterdam. I came close to going a couple of times, and my wife and I almost honeymooned there, before deciding on going elsewhere. Suffice it to say, going to Amsterdam is on my bucket list.

Before my wife and I decided to stay exclusively in Austria for our honeymoon, we did have a rough itinerary planned for Amsterdam.  There is a lot going on in that bohemian city. So why would anyone decided to hole themselves up in a hotel and play video games when there is so much more worthwhile things to do?

South-Park-World-of-Warcraft-dude

The folks at the Arcade Hotel, however hope that’s exactly what you would do. To their credit, the place does sound cool and the price for a stay is reasonable with rates starting at about $70 per night. Its location appears to be on the outskirts of the city center in a trendy and hip area where the streets are named for Dutch master painters.

The hotel also appears to be relatively small with only 36 rooms, which is not necessarily a bad thing.  Each room comes with a console and some games. Guests of the hotel can also borrow a handheld if that tickles their fancy or peruse the comic book library. The Arcade Hotel also maintains a fleet of loaner bikes, which is apparently the preferred mode of travel in Amsterdam.

bike-in-amsterdam-photo_1345908-770tall

I certainly don’t want to poo poo this establishment, because it sounds appealing to me personally as a gamer. The problem is that I can’t see myself taking full advantage of this establishment when visiting a city with such an amazing reputation as Amsterdam.

This is sound like your typical Catch-22. Put a hotel like this out in the middle of nowhere, and you will fail because who want to be out in the middle of nowhere.  Put this hotel in an amazing city like Amsterdam, and people don’t take advantage of the amenities because who want to be holed up in a room playing games when they are vacationing.

the_arcade_hotel_amsterdam_gaming_06

I hope that this place succeeds, and who know, maybe one day my wife and I will make it out to Amsterdam and get to stay at this place. We already have a list of things we wanted to see on our Honeymoon, such as:

5. Visit the Anne Frank House

anne-frank-museum-literary-sites-to-visit

4. Go on a canal boat tour

canal-boats-amsterdam

3. Go to various museums

Gerrit_van_Honthorst_-_De_koppelaarster

2. Go to a “Coffee Shop”

1382536130_Smokey_01

1. Shop at the many open-air markets

amsterdam-flower-market-10

BONUS: Red Light District

Red-Light-District-Amsterdam

On a side note, my wife and I have this on-going debate that originated when we were considering going to Amsterdam on our honeymoon and I mentioned that we should visit the Red Light district. I believed (AND STILL DO) that a hand job from a lady of the night is fine as long as no kissing is involved. It’s essentially a massage right?  I don’t give her crap when some dude gives her a massage when she and her friends have one their spa days.

She disagreed and says that if I did, she would have our marriage annulled as soon as we got back from our honeymoon. In the end, it was one of the main reasons why she decided we would go to Vienna and Salzburg instead of Amsterdam.

 

Selling Games Online is Like the Wild West – But I Can’t Shoot Anyone

It truly is amazing the amount of crap I have accumulated over the years. You find that special someone, move in together, eventually get married, and one day, you realize that you have no more room to store all your stuff.

When I moved in with the girl who would eventually become my wife, we lived in a tiny fourth floor walk-up in Manhattan. There was room for the barest essentials. Not like it mattered—rent was expensive and we were just starting our careers, so we didn’t have much to begin with.

However, we climbed that corporate ladder, started making some more money, and were able to afford bigger places and the ability to buy things—Many, many things. We moved into a bigger apartment, and after a few years, an even bigger apartment. A few years later, we bought an actual house, just like grownups.

Houses, by their nature, have multiple rooms, even our quaint one. My wife and I proceed to fill those rooms with even more things. Finally, one day, the wife and I were struck at all the shit we accumulated.  We felt cramped and suffocated. It was time to unload. We made a conscience effort to de-clutter and downsize. We wanted our space again. We wanted to simplify.

Furniture, appliances, clothes, accessories, electronics, and various sundries were listed online. We became experts of Craig’s List, eBay, and our personal favorite, Facebook Virtual Garage Sales.

It’s amazing what people will buy on a Facebook Virtual Sale. Things we were willing to throw away, were listed for shits and giggles for a few dollars and to our surprise, people would buy them. People purchased things like old coffee machines, tattered rugs, scratched furniture, and all things we considered garbage. Folks were literally buying our trash.

sanford-and-son-sign

Simplifying our space even galvanized us to simplify our budget. We took the leap and cut the chord, forgoing cable for just the Internet, and we have not missed it one bit. We became a streamlined household, physically and fiscally and it feels great.

Of course, I did my part as well.  There were many gaming related items that I decided to unload. Old physical copies of games, various accessories, consoles, you name it—they were going to be put up for sale.

Selling games and hardware online was not something entirely new to me.  I’ve done it a few times before, but I was more apt to trade things in at GameStop for credit. This time around though, I was going to attempt to get top dollar online for cold hard cash. CAPITALISM!

monopoly

The first thing I noticed is that selling games is going to attract a very different audience than selling a coffee table. Soccer mom’s are interested in coffee tables, because they read an article in Better Homes and Gardens on how to turn old furniture into shabby chic masterpieces and they are looking to do a project. Meanwhile, freaks, mouth breathers, criminals, and generally people without a modicum of social skill came out of the woodwork for my gaming stuff.

Take the PlayStation TV I listed for example. I got guys who wanted me to deliver the item to them, 50 miles from my house. I got guys who wanted me to ship it to them. I got guys who acted seemingly normally, until it was time to arrange for a place to meet and then got cold feet when I said to meet me at a public place, perhaps because their master plan involved stabbing me in the face.

I eventually sold it to a guy who refused to get out of his car, I had to hand the PlayStation TV to him through the window and he handed me cash. If the police drove by, they would have thought that I was selling this guy crack or a blowjob.

drug-dealer

Then there was the guy who wanted to buy a PS4 controller.  I was selling the controller for just $30 and it was like new and hardly used, but he kept trying to talk me down. I finally told him that the price was firm and I was moving on to the next person. He capitulated and agreed to meet at a public place. After showing up 30 minutes late, he looked over the controller, and asked if I’d take $25, I took it back and began to walk out when he agreed to pay the agreed upon price.

The weirdos really came out though when I listed my Xbox One Elite controller. I used it only a couple of times and realized that my meat hooks and sausage fingers were just too large. I kept hitting the bumpers accidentally and removed them. I paid a premium for what is essentially a nicer Xbox One controller, so I decided to pack it all up, put it back in the box and listed it on Craig’s List. This was a mistake.

The Elite controller is a hot item apparently. It’s pretty much sold out everywhere. Not to mention, the one I was selling was practically new and listed for $125 a savings of $25. I started getting responses immediately.

Craig’s List, is supposed to act like a local classified. I would post to the North Jersey page and people from North Jersey would find my post and then contact me, right? Why then, are there people from the next fucking state responding to my classified?

Will you Ship

This guy was my first respondent, so I was relatively nice to him and simply told him no. He tried to get someone local to meet me, but could not work it out, which is a shame, because the guy seemed normal, so I moved on.

The next guy was possibly illiterate, as he kept asking me questions that would have been answered if he simply read my post. He also was trying to lower the price, which was firm.

He finally agrees on the $125 price, and we make arrangements to meet, and then I get the following text.

Buyer Text

What’s funny is after all this back and forth; he flakes out and asks to meet at later times twice. I know that shit happens, but this deal became to sour in my book and I moved on to the next person. What’s funny is that this flake never contacted me again. It was like I dreamed the entire thing.

Luckily, the next person in line was normal. He agreed on the price and location, got there early, and was pleasant. No muss, no fuss.

So, happy ending, right? Not necessarily. I forgot to delete my Craig’s List post and got a few more responses, including this gem.

You Take 80

This dude struck a nerve with me. I love the written word and take umbrage when people butcher it.

Also, how does distance impact the price of something? Where the fuck did you learn how to haggle? How does distance impact the price? How is where you live my problem? Why don’t you go ahead and watch more American Pickers or Pawn Stars on the History Channel, because all of the sudden, everyone is an expert in dickering.

*May 28 - 00:05*

I especially like how in the end, he throws in how he already bought one for $70 and was no longer interested, all this in a span of eleven hours, in the middle of the night. Some people just feel the need to make it seem like they won. So I did what I do best. I gave a passive aggressive sarcastic response.

Fortunately, I think I’m done selling stuff, at least for a little while. The wife and I feel like we purged enough. When the time does come to unload more stuff, I think I’ll avoid Craig’s List. It’s not worth the aggravation. Simply put, it’s a wretched hive of scum and villainy. (Gratuitous Star Wars Quote)

Have any horror stories of selling used games online? Let me know in the comments.